AIM 4-1-21

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FIG 4-1-3 Hazardous Area Reporting Service

4-1-21. Hazardous Area Reporting Service

a. Selected FSSs provide flight monitoring where regularly traveled VFR routes cross large bodies of water, swamps, and mountains. This service is provided for the purpose of expeditiously alerting Search and Rescue facilities when required. (See FIG 4-1-3.)

1. When requesting the service either in person, by telephone or by radio, pilots should be prepared to give the following information: type of aircraft, altitude, indicated airspeed, present position, route of flight, heading.
2. Radio contacts are desired at least every 10 minutes. If contact is lost for more than 15 minutes, Search and Rescue will be alerted. Pilots are responsible for canceling their request for service when they are outside the service area boundary. Pilots experiencing two‐way radio failure are expected to land as soon as practicable and cancel their request for the service. FIG 4-1-3 depicts the areas and the FSS facilities involved in this program.

b. Long Island Sound Reporting Service.

New York and Bridgeport FSS Radio Sectors provide Long Island Sound Reporting service on request for aircraft traversing Long Island Sound.

1. When requesting the service, pilots should ask for SOUND REPORTING SERVICE and should be prepared to provide the following appropriate information:
(a) Type and color of aircraft;
(b) The specific route and altitude across the sound including the shore crossing point;
(c) The overwater crossing time;
(d) Number of persons on board; and
(e) True air speed.
2. Radio contacts are desired at least every 10 minutes; however, for flights of shorter duration a midsound report is requested. If contact is lost for more than 15 minutes Search and Rescue will be alerted. Pilots are responsible for canceling their request for the Long Island Sound Reporting Service when outside the service area boundary. Aircraft experiencing radio failure will be expected to land as soon as practicable and cancel their request for the service.
3. Communications. Primary communications - pilots are to transmit on 122.1 MHz and listen on one of the following VOR frequencies:
(a) New York FSS Radio Sector Controls:
(1) Hampton RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.6 MHz).
(2) Calverton VOR (FSS transmits on 117.2 and receives on standard FSS frequencies).
(3) Kennedy VORTAC (FSS transmits on 115.9 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(b) Bridgeport FSS Radio Sector Controls:
(1) Madison VORTAC (FSS transmits on 110.4 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(2) Groton VOR (FSS transmits on 110.85 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(3) Bridgeport VOR (FSS transmits on 108.8 and receives on 122.1 MHz).

c. Block Island Reporting Service.

Within the Long Island Sound Reporting Service, the New York FSS Radio Sector also provides an additional service for aircraft operating between Montauk Point and Block Island. When requesting this service, pilots should ask for BLOCK ISLAND REPORTING SERVICE and should be prepared to provide the same flight information as required for the Long Island Sound Reporting Service.

1. A minimum of three position reports are mandatory for this service; these are:
(a) Reporting leaving either Montauk Point or Block Island.
(b) Midway report.
(c) Report when over either Montauk Point or Block Island. At this time, the overwater service is canceled.
2. Communications. Pilots are to transmit and receive on 122.6 MHz.

NOTE- Pilots are advised that 122.6 MHz is a remote receiver located at the Hampton VORTAC site and designed to provide radio coverage between Hampton and Block Island. Flights proceeding beyond Block Island may contact the Bridgeport FSS Radio Sector by transmitting on 122.1 MHz and listening on Groton VOR frequency 110.85 MHz.

d. Cape Cod and Islands Radar Overwater Flight Following.

In addition to normal VFR radar advisory services, traffic permitting, Cape Approach Control provides a radar overwater flight following service for aircraft traversing the Cape Cod and adjacent Island area. Pilots desiring this service may contact Cape RAPCON on 118.2 MHz.

1. Pilots requesting this service should be prepared to give the following information:
(a) Type and color of aircraft;
(b) Altitude;
(c) Position and heading;
(d) Route of flight; and
(e) True airspeed.
2. For best radar coverage, pilots are encouraged to fly at 1,500 feet MSL or above.
3. Pilots are responsible for canceling their request for overwater flight following when they are over the mainland and/or outside the service area boundary.

e. Lake Reporting Service.

Cleveland and Lansing FSS Radio Sectors provide Lake Reporting Service on request for aircraft traversing the western half of Lake Erie; Green Bay, Kankakee, Lansing, and Terre Haute FSS Radio Sectors provide Lake Reporting Service on request for aircraft traversing Lake Michigan.

1. When requesting the service, pilots should ask for LAKE REPORTING SERVICE.
2. Pilots not on a VFR flight plan should be prepared to provide all information that is normally provided for a complete VFR flight plan.
3. Pilots already on a VFR flight plan should be prepared to provide the following information:
(a) Aircraft or flight identification.
(b) Type of aircraft.
(c) Near-shore crossing point or last fix before crossing.
(d) Proposed time over near-shore crossing point or last fix before crossing.
(e) Proposed altitude.
(f) Proposed route of flight.
(g) Estimated time over water.
(h) Next landing point.
(i) AFSS/FSS having complete VFR flight plan information.
4. Radio contacts must not exceed 10 minutes when pilots fly at an altitude that affords continuous communications. If radio contact is lost for more than 15 minutes (5 minutes after a scheduled reporting time), Search and Rescue (SAR) will be alerted.
5. The estimated time for crossing the far shore will be the scheduled reporting time for aircraft that fly at an altitude that does not afford continuous communication coverage while crossing the lake. If radio contact is not established within 5 minutes of that time, SAR will be alerted.
6. Pilots are responsible for canceling their request for Lake Reporting Service when outside the service area boundary. Aircraft experiencing radio failure will be expected to land as soon as practicable and cancel their Lake Reporting Service flight plan.
7. Communications. Primary communications - Pilots should communicate with the following facilities on the indicated frequencies:
(a) Cleveland FSS Radio Sector Controls:
(1) Cleveland RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.35 or 122.55 MHz).
(2) Sandusky VOR (FSS transmits on 109.2 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(b) Green Bay FSS Radio Sector Controls:
(1) Escanaba VORTAC (FSS transmits on 110.8 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(2) Green Bay RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.55 MHz).
(3) Manistique RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.25 MHz).
(4) Manitowoc VOR (FSS transmits on 111.0 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(5) Menominee VOR (FSS transmits on 109.6 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(6) Milwaukee RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.65 MHz).
(7) Falls VOR (FSS transmits on 110.0 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(c) Kankakee FSS Radio Sector Controls:
(1) Chicago Heights VORTAC (FSS transmits on 114.2 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
(2) Meigs RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.15 MHz).
(3) Waukegan RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.55 MHz).
(d) Lansing FSS Radio Sector Controls:
(1) Lake Erie. Detroit City RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.55 MHz).
(2) Lake Michigan:
[a] Keeler VORTAC (FSS transmits on 116.6 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
[b] Ludington RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.45 MHz).
[c] Manistee VORTAC (FSS transmits on 111.4 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
[d] Muskegon RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.5 MHz).
[e] Pellston RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.3 MHz).
[f] Pullman VORTAC (FSS transmits on 112.1 and receives on 122.1 MHz).
[g] Traverse City RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.65 MHz).
(e) Terre Haute FSS Radio Sector Controls. South Bend RCO (FSS transmits and receives on 122.6 MHz).

f. Everglades Reporting Service.

This service is offered by Miami Automated International Flight Service Station (MIA AIFSS), in extreme southern Florida. The service is provided to aircraft crossing the Florida Everglades, between Lee County (Ft. Myers, FL) VORTAC (RSW) on the northwest side, and Dolphin (Miami, FL) VOR (DHP) on the southeast side.

1. The pilot must request the service from Miami AIFSS.
2. MIA AIFSS frequency information, 122.2, 122.3, and 122.65.
3. The pilot must file a VFR flight plan with the remark: ERS.
4. The pilot must maintain 2000 feet of altitude.
5. The pilot must make position reports every ten (10) minutes. SAR begins fifteen (15) minutes after position report is not made on time.
6. The pilot is expected to land as soon as is practical, in the event of two-way radio failure, and advise MIA AIFSS that the service is terminated.
7. The pilot must notify Miami AIFSS when the flight plan is cancelled or the service is suspended.
Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) — Chapter 4 — Air Traffic Control
4-1-1 ARTCCs • 4-1-2 Towers • 4-1-3 FSS's • 4-1-4 Recording • 4-1-5 Release of IFR Aircraft • 4-1-6 Visits to Air Traffic Facilities • 4-1-7 Operation Take-off and Operation Raincheck • 4-1-8 Approach Control Service for VFR Aircraft • 4-1-9 Airports Without Operating Control Towers • 4-1-10. IFR Approaches/Ground Vehicle Ops • 4-1-11 UNICOM/MULTICOM Freqs • 4-1-12 UNICOM for ATC • 4-1-13 ATIS • 4-1-14 AFIS • 4-1-15 RADAR Traffic Service • 4-1-16 Safety Alert • 4-1-17 Radar Assistance to VFR Aircraft • 4-1-18. VFR Terminal Radar Services • 4-1-19 TEC • 4-1-20 Transponders • 4-1-21 Hazardous Area Reporting • 4-1-22 Airport Reservation Ops • 4-1-23 Requests for Waivers • 4-1-24 Weather Processor
4-2-1 General • 4-2-2 Radio Technique • 4-2-3 Contact Procedures • 4-2-4 Call Signs • 4-2-5 Leased Aircraft • 4-2-6. Ground Call Signs • 4-2-7 Phonetic Alphabet • 4-2-8 Figures • 4-2-9 Altitudes • 4-2-10 Directions • 4-2-11 Speeds • 4-2-12 Time • 4-2-13 Radio Inop Comm. • 4-2-14 VFR Comm.
4-3-1 General • 4-3-2 Towered Airports • 4-3-3 Traffic Patterns • 4-3-4 Visual Indicators at Untowered Airports • 4-3-5 Unexpected Maneuvers • 4-3-6. Use of Runways • 4-3-7 LLWS/Microbursts • 4-3-8 Braking Reports • 4-3-9 Runway Friction • 4-3-10 Intersection Takeoffs • 4-3-11 LAHSO • 4-3-12 Low Approach • 4-3-13 Light Signals • 4-3-14 Comms. • 4-3-15 Departure Delays • 4-3-16 VFR Flights • 4-3-17 VFR Helicopter Ops • 4-3-18 Taxiing • 4-3-19 Low Vis. Taxi • 4-3-20 Exiting the Runway • 4-3-21 Practice Approaches • 4-3-22 Option Approach • 4-3-23 Aircraft Lights • 4-3-24 Flight Inspection/`Flight Check' Aircraft in Terminal Areas • 4-3-25 Hand Signals • 4-3-26 Uncontrolled Airports With ASOS/AWOS
4-4-1 Clearance • 4-4-2 Clearance Prefix • 4-4-3 Clearance Items • 4-4-4 Amended Clearances • 4-4-5 CDR • 4-4-6 Special VFR • 4-4-7 Pilot Responsibility • 4-4-8 VFR-on-top • 4-4-9 VFR/IFR • 4-4-10 Adherence to Clearance • 4-4-11 IFR Separation • 4-4-12 Speed Adjustments • 4-4-13 Runway Separation • 4-4-14 Visual Separation • 4-4-15 Visual Clearing Procedures • 4-4-16 TCAS I & II • 4-4-17 TIS
4-5-1 Radar • 4-5-2 ATCRBS • AIM 4-5-34-5-3 Surveillance Radar • 4-5-4 PAR • 4-5-5 ASDE-X • 4-5-6 TIS • 4-5-7 ADS-B • 4-5-8 TIS-B • 4-5-9 FIS-B • 4-5-10 ADS-R
4-6-1 RVSM Mandate • 4-6-2 • Flight Levels • 4-6-3 Operator Approval • 4-6-4 Flight Planning into RVSM • 4-6-5 Pilot RVSM • 4-6-6 MWA • 4-6-7 Wake Turbulence • 4-6-8 Pilot/Controller Phraseology • 4-6-9 Contingency Actions • 4-6-10 Accommodation of Non-RVSM • 4-6-11 Climb/Descent to/from Flight Levels Above RVSM